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Museum of Osteopathic Medicine

iConnect News


Do you have a favorite memory of Dr. Max Gutensohn?

May 20, 2010
Posted In: Headlines, Hot Sheet

A. T. Still University is soliciting memories of Dr. Max Gutensohn to be selected for publication in a book about his life.

Dr. Max, who died in 2002, touched the hearts and minds of his patients, students, and colleagues and was known as an icon in the osteopathic profession.

The book is intended to capture these special stories and pay tribute to a giant in the osteopathic profession.

All proceeds from the book will go to a Max Gutensohn endowment.

Memories or stories may be e-mailed to pbfield@nemr.net or mailed to Phyllis Blondefield, Ph.D., 606 2nd St., Pollock, MO 63560. They can be funny or serious, personal or professional. Tributes are also welcome.

The deadline for submission is May 21.

One response to “Do you have a favorite memory of Dr. Max Gutensohn?”

  1. Dr. Max was an inspiration to me. He exemplified what I would consider my concept of the ideal physician, was an outstanding educater and a nice guy to top it off. the Summer befor my first year at KCOM I worked in the medical library. I remember my first time meeting Dr. Max. He had with him his medical bag/equipment and was going to see a patient in the hospital. I must have looked lost as I had come into the main Gutensohn clinic doors for the first time and wasn’t sure how to get to the medical library. Dr. Max must have sensed this and despite looking like he had something important to do he stopped and quite kindly asked if there was anything he could do to help me out. I had no idea who he was (I had a pretty good idea he was a doctor though of course due to his dress and medical bag). He not only pointed me in the right direction he took me there himself and all the while asked questions about me that made me feel very comfortable. He appeared sincerely very excited to hear that I was going to be one of the incoming freshman and gave me some pointers on how to get off to a good start and wished me well. He was so kind and so humble that I would never have guessed that I just walked through a clinic named after him.

    I had multiple other great experiences with him coming in to assist with teaching, seeing him coming in to see patients at late (and early) hours and as a mentor.

    He was always through discussion and actions promoting the Osteopathic profession. He gave me more pride in my profession than I allready had (and I had a lot)!

    He is the kind of physician and person that I hope to be someday. If I only become half the physician and man that he was I will have accomplished a lot.

    Jonathan D. Colen, D.O. KCOM class of ’94

  2. Dr. Max was an inspiration to me. He exemplified what I would consider my concept of the ideal physician, was an outstanding educater and a nice guy to top it off. the Summer befor my first year at KCOM I worked in the medical library. I remember my first time meeting Dr. Max. He had with him his medical bag/equipment and was going to see a patient in the hospital. I must have looked lost as I had come into the main Gutensohn clinic doors for the first time and wasn’t sure how to get to the medical library. Dr. Max must have sensed this and despite looking like he had something important to do he stopped and quite kindly asked if there was anything he could do to help me out. I had no idea who he was (I had a pretty good idea he was a doctor though of course due to his dress and medical bag). He not only pointed me in the right direction he took me there himself and all the while asked questions about me that made me feel very comfortable. He appeared sincerely very excited to hear that I was going to be one of the incoming freshman and gave me some pointers on how to get off to a good start and wished me well. He was so kind and so humble that I would never have guessed that I just walked through a clinic named after him.

    I had multiple other great experiences with him coming in to assist with teaching, seeing him coming in to see patients at late (and early) hours and as a mentor.

    He was always through discussion and actions promoting the Osteopathic profession. He gave me more pride in my profession than I allready had (and I had a lot)!

    He is the kind of physician and person that I hope to be someday. If I only become half the physician and man that he was I will have accomplished a lot.

    Jonathan D. Colen, D.O. KCOM class of ’94

  3. Dr. Max was an inspiration to me. He exemplified what I would consider my concept of the ideal physician, was an outstanding educater and a nice guy to top it off. the Summer befor my first year at KCOM I worked in the medical library. I remember my first time meeting Dr. Max. He had with him his medical bag/equipment and was going to see a patient in the hospital. I must have looked lost as I had come into the main Gutensohn clinic doors for the first time and wasn’t sure how to get to the medical library. Dr. Max must have sensed this and despite looking like he had something important to do he stopped and quite kindly asked if there was anything he could do to help me out. I had no idea who he was (I had a pretty good idea he was a doctor though of course due to his dress and medical bag). He not only pointed me in the right direction he took me there himself and all the while asked questions about me that made me feel very comfortable. He appeared sincerely very excited to hear that I was going to be one of the incoming freshman and gave me some pointers on how to get off to a good start and wished me well. He was so kind and so humble that I would never have guessed that I just walked through a clinic named after him.

    I had multiple other great experiences with him coming in to assist with teaching, seeing him coming in to see patients at late (and early) hours and as a mentor.

    He was always through discussion and actions promoting the Osteopathic profession. He gave me more pride in my profession than I allready had (and I had a lot)!

    He is the kind of physician and person that I hope to be someday. If I only become half the physician and man that he was I will have accomplished a lot.

    Jonathan D. Colen, D.O. KCOM class of ’94

  4. Dr. Max was an inspiration to me. He exemplified what I would consider my concept of the ideal physician, was an outstanding educater and a nice guy to top it off. the Summer befor my first year at KCOM I worked in the medical library. I remember my first time meeting Dr. Max. He had with him his medical bag/equipment and was going to see a patient in the hospital. I must have looked lost as I had come into the main Gutensohn clinic doors for the first time and wasn’t sure how to get to the medical library. Dr. Max must have sensed this and despite looking like he had something important to do he stopped and quite kindly asked if there was anything he could do to help me out. I had no idea who he was (I had a pretty good idea he was a doctor though of course due to his dress and medical bag). He not only pointed me in the right direction he took me there himself and all the while asked questions about me that made me feel very comfortable. He appeared sincerely very excited to hear that I was going to be one of the incoming freshman and gave me some pointers on how to get off to a good start and wished me well. He was so kind and so humble that I would never have guessed that I just walked through a clinic named after him.

    I had multiple other great experiences with him coming in to assist with teaching, seeing him coming in to see patients at late (and early) hours and as a mentor.

    He was always through discussion and actions promoting the Osteopathic profession. He gave me more pride in my profession than I allready had (and I had a lot)!

    He is the kind of physician and person that I hope to be someday. If I only become half the physician and man that he was I will have accomplished a lot.

    Jonathan D. Colen, D.O. KCOM class of ’94

  5. Dr. Max was an inspiration to me. He exemplified what I would consider my concept of the ideal physician, was an outstanding educater and a nice guy to top it off. the Summer befor my first year at KCOM I worked in the medical library. I remember my first time meeting Dr. Max. He had with him his medical bag/equipment and was going to see a patient in the hospital. I must have looked lost as I had come into the main Gutensohn clinic doors for the first time and wasn’t sure how to get to the medical library. Dr. Max must have sensed this and despite looking like he had something important to do he stopped and quite kindly asked if there was anything he could do to help me out. I had no idea who he was (I had a pretty good idea he was a doctor though of course due to his dress and medical bag). He not only pointed me in the right direction he took me there himself and all the while asked questions about me that made me feel very comfortable. He appeared sincerely very excited to hear that I was going to be one of the incoming freshman and gave me some pointers on how to get off to a good start and wished me well. He was so kind and so humble that I would never have guessed that I just walked through a clinic named after him.

    I had multiple other great experiences with him coming in to assist with teaching, seeing him coming in to see patients at late (and early) hours and as a mentor.

    He was always through discussion and actions promoting the Osteopathic profession. He gave me more pride in my profession than I allready had (and I had a lot)!

    He is the kind of physician and person that I hope to be someday. If I only become half the physician and man that he was I will have accomplished a lot.

    Jonathan D. Colen, D.O. KCOM class of ’94

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