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iConnect News


What will ATSU look like?

May 6, 2014
Posted In: Features, Headlines

As a mission-focused institution, a solid strategic plan is essential to laying the groundwork for making decisions—big and small—that will affect students, faculty, staff, and the communities the University is privileged to serve. “Soon to celebrate 125 years, ATSU must continue developing its signature identity, embrace a strong interdisciplinary culture, foster health professions education innovation, and maintain its reputation as the ‘go-to’ national and international authority on osteopathic medicine—whole person healthcare,” says ATSU President Craig M. Phelps, DO, ’84. To help meet these goals, a new strategic planning committee has been established to identify opportunities and challenges facing ATSU and shape a plan for 2016-20. This inclusive group of internal and external stakeholders will guide the plan’s design and refinement. According to Dr. Phelps, the committee will examine how ATSU will accomplish its vision of preeminence; which skills and resources our faculty and staff will need to continue successfully educating students; what experience our students will need to be post-graduate, market, and patient-care ready; and what ATSU can do to best prepare for America’s changing demographic and economic future.

“Soon to celebrate 125 years, ATSU must continue developing its signature identity, embrace a strong interdisciplinary culture, foster health professions education innovation, and maintain its reputation as the ‘go-to’ national and international authority on osteopathic medicine—whole person healthcare.” – Craig M. Phelps

Additionally, the committee will consider “megatrends” facing America’s economy, higher education, and health professions education. The Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges has identified eight megatrends facing higher education, which includes new learning modalities, demographic shifts, decline in enrollment growth, student retention and completion pressures, market niche and branding, twin forces of technology and globalism, a changing economic model, and academic governance. An analysis of these trends will help form the foundation for ATSU’s strategic plan. “Colleges and universities failing to confront tomorrow’s rapidly changing environment will find themselves uninformed and unprepared,” Dr. Phelps says. “ATSU will not find itself among the uninformed or unprepared as we prepare a bold and encompassing strategic plan.” The University community will have an opportunity to help ATSU envision its future by participating in the strategic planning process. Details forthcoming, all ATSU stakeholders will be invited to contribute and comment on the plan. Once a plan is formulated, it will go to the Board of Trustees for approval. With the guidance of the newly established committee, the plan will shape how efforts, resources, and activities are prioritized as it is implemented in 2016, taking the University to new heights in 2020 and beyond.

2016-20 Strategic Plan Committee

Steering Committee Michael A. McManis, PhD, vice president, planning, assessment, & institutional effectiveness, ATSU Norman Gevitz, PhD, senior vice president, academic affairs, ATSU Lori Haxton, MA, vice president, student affairs, ATSU O.T. Wendel, PhD, senior vice president, strategic university initiatives, ATSU Neal R. Chamberlain, PhD, associate professor, microbiology/immunology, KCOM, university faculty senate, ATSU Members Jeffrey Alexander, PhD, associate professor, health sciences, ASHS Lee Bonnel, academic success coordinator, SHM, staff council, ATSU Ann Lee Burch, PT, EdD, MPH, MS, vice dean and associate professor, ASHS John George, PhD, director, planning, assessment, & institutional effectiveness, ATSU Monnie Harrison, CPA, vice president for finance, ATSU Mary (Liz) Kaz, EdD, MS, associate dean, MOSDOH Bryan Krusniak, MBA, assistant vice president, information technology & services, ATSU Clinton Normore, MBA, director, diversity, ATSU Klud Razoky, BDS, assistant dean, ASDOH Randy Rogers, CFP, vice president, university advancement, ATSU Greg Rubenstein, MA, interim co-vice president, communication & marketing, ATSU Patricia S. Sexton, DHEd, associate dean, curriculum, KCOM Gaylah Sublette, MBA, associate vice president, sponsored programs, ATSU Alison Valier, PhD, ATC, associate professor, athletic training, ASHS Sharon Obadia, DO, director, SOMA Students Addison Roberts, OMS II, KCOM Alison Kapchinske, OT, ’15, ASHS

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