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Second-year A.T. Still University Athletic Training student, Jessica Markbreiter, AT, ATC, has been selected as the 2014 Greenberg Center for Skeletal Dysplasias Scholarship recipient.

The award, which is facilitated in partnership through Little People of America, Inc., supports students who have demonstrated a commitment to completing their education.

Congratulations, Jessica!

Jessica Markbreiter

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ibtBvEQ7UhjjotyK2WpczQ0i0qRH31cWAAT5w4vpJ6nsqNj29OlAYG0Xg0XWK9yuadqzmQ=w1713-h793A.T. Still University’s School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona (ATSU-SOMA) students, faculty and staff participated in a unique poverty simulation on the Arizona campus, Wed., July 30 in the Javelina and Owl classrooms. Two simulations were held to accommodate the 110 ATSU-SOMA students and other ATSU faculty from the Arizona School of Dentistry & Oral Health (ATSU-ASDOH), Arizona School of Health Sciences (ATSU-ASHS), and Student Services who also participated.

According to Lorree Ratto, PhD, associate professor and chair, medical humanities and healthcare leadership, ATSU-SOMA, and who coordinated the event, the poverty simulation is a unique, interactive experience that helps people begin to understand what life is like with a shortage of money and an abundance of stress. “The simulation moves you to be more sensitive to the feelings and needs of those who are living in poverty,” said Dr. Ratto.

The participants took on the roles of family members who face a variety of socioeconomic and healthcare challenges, but typical circumstances for most under served and people living in poverty. Participants were seated in family clusters, and community resources were located at tables around the perimeter of the room. The simulation offered four, 15-minute weeks, compressing time and adding to the chaotic and sometimes hectic life families living in poverty face.

“There are more than 50 million people in the United States living in poverty,” said Dr. Ratto. “Our students need to be prepared to assist these patients with resources when they are at their Community Health Centers next year, and hopefully this exercise will make our students more empathetic towards their patients,” Dr. Ratto concluded.

More photos of the simulation can be found on the ATSU Facebook page.

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MS1Orientation10FWJuly 14 was special day for the ATSU-School of Osteopathic Medicine (ATSU-SOMA) first-year students. Prior to the white coat ceremony held on that day, the ATSU-SOMA Class of 2018 was introduced to the Virtual Community Health Center (VCHC) concept, known as Envision CHC. Frederic Schwartz, DO, ’69, FACOFP, associate dean for clinical education and chair of family and community medicine, ATSU-SOMA, provided an overview of Envision CHC to the first-year students who will be engaged with patients and families from the VCHC.

Tom Trompeter, CEO of HealthPoint Community Health Center (CHC) in Seattle, Wash., and who was also the keynote speaker at the white coat ceremony, led a discussion among students to help them orient to primary care, painting a picture of how a CHC works on transforming a community. Following this discussion, students were requested to work in teams to discuss how they, as medical students, could benefit their future CHC communities. Some of their comments include:

“Know the community we are serving, including cultural strengths and needs.”

“Inspire and encourage community members to let them know they have a voice and the ability to create change among their own community.”

“Bridge the gap between the community and health teams through education.”

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9LGuTafHF3jFX6RgUWXaglFsmj0-1Kbmk0_rhFpaPjcVd6q_IrIXQNbIsp4fMc9lgXpqZA=w1713-h793More than 300 ATSU students confirmed their professional commitment at the annual white coat and pinning ceremony at the Mesa Arts Center’s Ikeda Theater on July 14, 2014, in Mesa, Ariz.

The Arizona School of Dentistry & Oral Health’s (ASDOH) class of 2018, the School of Osteopathic Medicine (SOMA) in Arizona’s class of 2018, and the Arizona School of Health Sciences physician assistant (PA) class of 2016 and physical therapy (PT) class of 2015 were presented white coats in four separate ceremonies. The PA class of 2015 participated in a pinning ceremony, representing the completion of a didactic year of study and entry into the clinical phase of the program. Overall, the numbers of students who received their white coats or pinning were: 61 (PT); 109 (SOMA); 76 (ASDOH); 52 (PA white coats); and 50 (PA pinning).

On July 12, 2014, the Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine (KCOM) class of 2018 and the Missouri School of Dentistry & Oral Health (MOSDOH) class of 2018 celebrated their white coat ceremonies with 172 KCOM and 42 MOSDOH students receiving their white coats at Baldwin Hall Auditorium, Truman State University in Kirksville, MO.

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ZM6K8493A.T. Still University researchers are recruiting healthy individuals aged 14 to 24 years old for a study on balance. Researchers are looking at four different balance tests. Individuals interested in participating in this study will need to be available for one 60-minute testing session on the ATSU Mesa Campus. There is no cost for being in this study. If you are interested in participating in this study, please contact Dr. John Heick at 480-219-6065 or at jheick@atsu.edu.

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